Annotated Bibliographies by Topic (ML 120-128 and VARIOUS)


General Research

Adkins, Cecil, and Alis Dickinson. Doctoral Dissertations in Musicology, 7th North American Edition, 2d International Edition.

Basart, Ann P. Writing about Music: A Guide to Publishing for Authors and Reviewers.

Beuton, Rita. Ed. RISM Directory of Music Research Libraries. Part III: Spain, France, Italy, Portugal.

Brockman, William S. Music: A Guide to the Reference Literature.

Brook, Barry S., and Richard Viano. Thematic Catalogues in Music: An Annotated Bibliography, 2d ed.

Brenet, Michel. Bibliographie des bibliographies musicales.

Crabtree, Philip D., and Donald H. Foster. Sourcebook for Research in Music.

Crofton, Ian, and Donald Fraser, comp. A Dictionary of Musical Quotations.

Cummings, David M., ed.International Who’s Who in Music and Musician’s Directory (In the Classical and Light Classical Fields), 16th ed.

Davies, J. H. Musicalia: Sources of Information in Music, 2d ed.

Davis, Elizabeth, ed. A Basic Music Library: Essential Scores and Sound Recordings, 3d ed.

Duckles, Vincent H., Ida Reed, and Michael A. Keller. Music Reference and Research Materials: An Annotated Bibliography, 5th ed.

Furness, Clifton Joseph. A Bibliography of Works Containing Valuable Bibliographies of Books and Articles on Musical Subjects.

Green, Richard D. Index to Composer Bibliographies.

Harrold, Ann, and Graham Lea. Musaurus: A Music Thesaurus— A New Approach to Organising Music Information.

Indiana University. Worldwide Internet Music Resources.

Kupferberg, Herbert. The Book of Classical Music Lists.

LeBrecht, Norman. The Book of Musical Anecdotes.

Mixter, Keith E. General Bibliography for Music Research, 3d ed.

Pruett, James W., and Thomas P. Slavens. Research Guide to Musicology.

Shapiro, Nat, comp. and ed. The Encyclopedia of Quotations about Music.


Adkins, Cecil, and Alis Dickinson. Doctoral Dissertations in Musicology, 7th North American Edition, 2d International Edition. n.p., American Musicological Society and International Musicological Society, 1984.  Mus Ref ML 128 .M8 A4 1984 (supplements, 1990)

Uses: A guide to past and current dissertations in musicology and related fields of study. Useful for determining the feasibility of a dissertation topic.

Coverage: 1951-1996. Originally focused on American-Canadian dissertations, later editions more international in coverage (over 30 countries). First edition also published titles of works in progress, 2d edition and supplements do not.

Organization: Entries are grouped under broad historical categories, therein organized by topic. Each entry supplies the UMI numbers, Dissertation Abstracts reference numbers as well as RILM numbers. Includes subject and author indexes.

Pros: A major international source for dissertation topics in musicology. Now supplemented and updated by “Doctoral Dissertations in Musicology Online.” [http://www.music.indiana.edu/ddm]

EB


Basart, Ann P. Writing about Music: A Guide to Publishing for Authors and Reviewers. With a foreword by Joseph Kerman. Fallen Leaf Reference Books in Music, No. 11. Berkeley, Calif.: Fallen Leaf Press, 1989. Mus Ref ML 128 .P242 B37 1989

Use: Provides guidance to editorial requirements, manuscript submission, refereeing procedures, and other practical publication practices for current (as of 1989) periodicals.

Coverage: Detailed information on 430 current (as of 1989) periodicals from 21 countries which publish music related articles in English. Only periodicals which accept unsolicited materials are included. Non-scholarly periodicals are excluded.

Organization: Periodicals are listed alphabetically by title, as are monographs in a series. Indexes of organizations, material types, and subject are included.

Pros: Provides a guide for soliciting articles or reviews for publication. Very practical tool with clear explanations on the intent, scope academic writing standards, etc. of each periodical.

Cons: Outdated.

MHu


Beuton, Rita. Ed. RISM Directory of Music Research Libraries. Part III: Spain, France, Italy, Portugal. Iowa City: The University of Iowa, 1972. Mus Ref ML 113.16 Vol. cl pt.3

Use: A directory intended primarily for use with RISM series A and B. This directory provides further information to researchers about a library holding a particular work.

Coverage: This book is a directory of libraries in Spain, France, Italy, Portugal with musical research sections that were active between 1966-1972.

Organization: The introduction explains the methods used to create this directory. After the introduction is a brief bibliography citing other books dealing with libraries. Next is an extensive list of literature cited in abbreviated form, and other abbreviations used by this volume. The major part of this book is the directory itself which is organized first by country, then alphabetically by city, and finally alphabetically by the name of the institution. The directory includes 119 entries from Spain, 180 from France, 439 from Italy, and 45 from Portugal. At the end of the directory there is an index to the libraries which includes former names, collections, special holdings, donors, etc.. The index refers to entries by entry number and not by page number. It provides the name, address, collections, special equipments (microfilm, microfiche), reproductions of material (microfilm, photo copies, xerox), catalogues available, published catalogues, other published literature about the institution or its holdings, number of musical titles or volumes in the collection, if special permission is required for access, the hours and days of operation, and a brief description of the institution for each library.

Pros: The information for each institution was provided by workers at the institution reflecting that the information is likely accurate.

Cons: The information is accurate up to the publication date of 1972. The information was provided as a response to questionnaire sent to each institution. As a result, information about each institution varies according to each individuals interpretation of the questionnaire. Therefore, there exists discrepancies about the hours and days of operation, general terminology used, and even the naming of the institution (several institutions have an official name and a traditional name). 250 of the libraries listed in the directory appear despite the fact that no questionnaire was received from it.

CA


Brockman, William S. Music: A Guide to the Reference Literature. Reference Sources in the Humanities Series. Englewood, Colo.: Libraries Unlimited Inc., 1987. Mus Ref ML 113 .B85 1987

Use: Directs user to musicology-related reference sources and research bibliographies. Particularly useful for undergraduate research; only English language materials are included.

Coverage: Extensive coverage of contemporary English language reference sources and bibliographic publications. Current through 1987.

Organization: Six large sections: General Reference Sources, General Bibliographical Sources, Bibliographies of Music Literature, Bibliographies of Music, Discographies, and Supplemental Sources. Each section contains several smaller subsections focusing on narrower topics. Each citation includes bibliographic information, relevant catalogue numbers, and an abstract.

Pros: Limited to English language sources.

Cons: Citations include LC and ISBN numbers. Annotated entries.

BM


Brook, Barry S., and Richard Viano. Thematic Catalogues in Music: An Annotated Bibliography, 2d ed. Annotated Reference Tools in Music, no. 5. Stuyvesant, N.Y.: Pendragon Press, 1997. Mus Ref ML 113 .B86 1997

Use: Directs user to thematic catalogues of Classical music. Organized by composer and/or compiler.

Coverage: Extensive international coverage of thematic catalogues for classical music. Includes listings for current, published thematic catalogues of works by one composer, important private catalogues, and other compilations deemed important by the authors. Current through 1997.

Organization: Numbered entries integrated alphabetically by composer, compiler, or both. Each citation includes bibliographic information followed by a brief abstract. Indexes provide additional points of access.

Pros: Prefaced by an introduction on how to navigate the source. Information on original manuscripts included where applicable. Annotated entries. Information about the location and condition of original manuscripts included with some entries. Most current listing in print.

BM


Brenet, Michel. Bibliographie des bibliographies musicales. Da Capo Press Music Reprint Series. New York: Da Capo Press, 1971 (originally published in 1913). Mus Ref ML 113 .B65 B5 1971

Use: Directs user to important libraries, private collections, and published and unpublished catalogues of music in pre-war Europe. Now useful as a record of libraries and collections now lost, scattered, or obscure.

Coverage: Cites important libraries, public and private collections, and bibliographies in major European countries and languages through the nineteenth century. No clear criteria for inclusion. Limited coverage of early twentieth century.

Organization: Divided into five large sections: integrated general title or author (for bibliographic sources in print), composer (for manuscript and literature collections), public libraries (organized by city), private libraries and catalogues (organized by owner or location), and editors, publishers, and compilers of catalogues and libraries. Each entry contains minimal bibliographic information (including city for libraries), as well as a brief abstract.

Cons: Outdated for current usage. Citations and abstracts in French German, Italian, or English, depending on the location or language of the source. No general index.

BM


Crabtree, Philip D., and Donald H. Foster. Sourcebook for Research in Music. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 1993. Mus Ref ML 113 .C68 1993

Use: Directs user to musicology-related reference resources and research bibliographies. Especially useful for the inexperienced researcher; defines important bibliographic terms and directs user to other helpful resources. More instruction-oriented than Duckles.

Coverage: Focuses on major, published music references such as dictionaries, writing manuals, biographies, journals, collections, databases, primary sources, thematic catalogues, discographies, dissertations, etc. Mostly in German, French, or English. Topics range from the Music Industry to Gregorian chant.

Organization: Introductory chapter includes a three-part orientation to bibliographic terminologies of the English, German, and French languages, and an introduction to Library of Congress music classification. The body of the guide is divided into seven additional chapters: Basic Bibliographical Tools for Research in Music, Area Bibliographies and Other Reference Sources, Dictionaries and Encyclopedias of Music, Sources Treating the History of Music, Current Research Journals in Music, Editions of Music, and Miscellaneous Sources. Chapters are divided into subsections in which citations are organized chronologically. Each citation lists bibliographic information followed by an abstract. Two indexes: Index of Authors, Editors, Compilers, and Translators, and Index of Titles.

Pros: Current. Main focus on music history.

Cons: A knowledge of reference terminology is necessary in understanding the organization of the book.

Reviews: Ethnomusicology: Journal of the Society of Ethnomusicology XXXIX/2 (spring- summer 1995): 307; Heck, Thomas F. Fontes artis musicae XLI/4 (October-December 1994): 392-94; Schwindt-Gross, Nicole. Die Musikforschung XLVIII/1 (January-March 1995): 75; Vanhulst, Henri. Revue belge de musicologie/Belgische tijd schrift voor muziekwentenschap XLIX (1995): 271-72; Wagstaff, John. Music and Letters LXX VI/1 (May 1995): 274-75.

LK/BM


Crofton, Ian, and Donald Fraser, comp. A Dictionary of Musical Quotations. New York: Schirmer Books, 1985. Mus Ref ML 66 .C68 1985

Use: A collection of quotations by and about music and musicians for reading and browsing.

Coverage: Contains 3,000 quotes on many aspects of music, including historical and social, technical and psychological. Tries to cover a wide range of music over a significant time span but concentrates most heavily on classical music. Quotations are given in original or translated English.

Organization: Arranged alphabetically according to topic, composer, or performer. Each quotation appears under its heading, with the person quoting it placed underneath in boldtype, along with the circumstances of the quotation. Each composer’s section begins with his or her own quotations then present quotations by others by date of utterance. Under “Conductors”, the arrangements is alphabetical and under “Stars” the arrangement is by date of birth of the performer. Each page begins a new numbering sequence from 1 for the quotations on the page. Cross references are provided for similar subjects. Also includes an index of authors and speakers of quotations as well as an index consisting of keywords.

Pros: Because of the small print, more quotations are able to be included than other books of quotations in larger print. Covers a very broad range of composers and musical genres, including many contemporary composers and styles.

Cons: The print is small, so it may be hard to read for some, though its roman type makes it very clear. The actual date or year the quotation was made is not given for many of them, making it hard to put them into context. Some of the information on composers or performers is rather sketchy–without a knowledge of who they are in the course of music, the impact of the quotation is lost.

CK


Cummings, David M., ed. International Who’s Who in Music and Musician’s Directory (In the Classical and Light Classical Fields), 16th ed. (1998/99). Edited by David M. Cummings. Cambridge: International Biographic Centre, 1998.  Mus Ref ML 106 .G7 W4 Vol. 16

Uses: Resumes of prominent musicians, musicologists, music critics, managers, publishers and librarians. Useful for biographical and professional information.

Coverage: Began in 1935. Emphasis on western European and North American persons. Includes addresses of subjects and organizations.

Organization: Main body consists of concise biographies of individuals. In addition, there are several appendices including lists with addresses of organizations such as Orchestras, Opera Companies, Festivals, Competitions, Conservatories and the like.

Pros: Each new edition contains up to 90% new information. Includes only living subjects, with each initial entry being supplied by the subject.

EB


Davies, J. H. Musicalia: Sources of Information in Music, 2d ed. Commonwealth and International Library: Libraries and Technical Information Division. Oxford: Pergamon Press, 1969. Mus Ref ML 113 .D383 M9 1969

Use: A prose guide directing musicians and music lovers to music and music literature resources most pertinent to their needs.

Coverage: Guides the reader to scholarly and non-scholarly resources relating specific genres of classical and jazz music. Cites the broadest, most accessible resources in each field.

Organization: Divided into seventeen chapters directed toward various groups of readers: The Ordinary Listener, The Choral Conductor, The Musicologist, the Broadcaster, etc. Each chapter is written in standard prose and explores the responsibilities, needs, and important resources available to the title group. Includes a general index and three appendixes: Principle music collections in Britain, Music publishers and agents, and Music publishers’ organizations.

Pros: Prose format makes this source ineffective for quick reference.

Cons: Currently outdated by thirty years.

BM


Davis, Elizabeth, ed. A Basic Music Library: Essential Scores and Sound Recordings, 3d ed. Compiled by the Music Library Association. Chicago and London: American Library Association, 1997. Mus Ref ML 113 .B3 1997

Use: A recommended guide for selecting and buying both printed and recorded music. Especially useful for librarians or other music collectors. Intended for small libraries.

Coverage: World-wide in scope. Represents the world of music in a balanced and diverse manner, geographically and culturally. Spans from Medieval music to current.

Organization: Separated into two parts. Part One, Scores, consists of full and study scores for orchestral literature, chamber music, and solo editions (woodwinds, brass, percussion, strings, keyboard, jazz fake books, and vocal).  Part Two, Sound Recordings, is comprised of Western Classical Music, Traditional and Popular Music of the Americas and Europe, and Music of the Non-Western World. Appendixes list suppliers of scores and sound recordings. Bibliographic Resources found at end of book along with four indexes (scores by black composers, women composers, all scores, and sound recordings).

Pros: Sound recordings are international in coverage. Includes publishers and prices for printed music.

Cons: Selective, and condensed list of priority musical scores.

JM


Duckles, Vincent H., Ida Reed, and Michael A. Keller. Music Reference and Research Materials: An Annotated Bibliography, 5th ed. Indexed by Linda Solow Blotner. New York: Schirmer Books, 1997. Mus Ref ML 113 .D83 1997

Use: Directs user to reference sources and bibliographic publications in the field of musicology. Useful for undergraduate and scholarly research by topic. Perhaps the most extensive resource of its kind.

Coverage: Extensive international coverage of resources relating to classical and western art music. Cites scholarly reference sources and bibliographic publications in the field of musicology. Current through 1997.

Organization: Chapters by broad subject area. References to major dictionaries, encyclopedias, histories, guides to bibliographies of music and music literature, reference works on individual composers and their music, catalogues of music libraries/collections and instrument collections, related works on music printing and publishing, discographies, electronic music information sources, as well as materials relevant to music business and library science. Annotation/description for each listing.

Pros: Main value of this bibliography is its large scope and comprehensive set of annotations. Although Duckles and Reed cannot index every reference and research material in a book this size, one can obtain a strong impression of what information is available for a specific query by searching this book.

JI/BM


Furness, Clifton Joseph. A Bibliography of Works Containing Valuable Bibliographies of Books and Articles on Musical Subjects. Boston: University of Rochester, 1934. Mus Ref ML 128 .B28 F87x 1934

Use: Early twentieth-century guide to libraries, collections, and bibliographies now useful for historical perspective. Lists pre-World War II locations of valuable catalogues and collections.

Coverage: Cites eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century European and American music libraries, collections, and bibliographies. Limited, biased coverage; originally intended as a supplemental resource for a university course in music research. Includes some listings for bibliographies tangentially related to music.

Organization: Integrated alphabetical listing of music libraries by author, title, city, etc.

Pros: Lists some obscure sources more current publications may have missed.

Cons: Original manuscript copy; poor typesetting. Limited coverage. Outdated for current use. Lacks complete bibliographic citations for many entries. No abstracts.

BM


Green, Richard D. Index to Composer Bibliographies. Detroit Studies in Musicology, no. 53. Detroit, Mich.: Information Coordinators, 1985. Mus Ref: ML 113 .G793 1985

Use: Directs user to bibliographies of music literature and archival records concerning specific composers and their music.

Coverage: Extensive international coverage of published bibliographies for significant classical and popular composers. Current through 1985.

Organization: Numbered entries, alphabetical by composer. Under each composer, bibliographies are listed alphabetically. Each entry includes complete bibliographic information followed by an abstract.

Pros: Probably the most current and comprehensive resource of its kind. Annotated entries.

Cons: Limited coverage of popular music composers.

BM


Harrold, Ann, and Graham Lea. Musaurus: A Music Thesaurus— A New Approach to Organising Music Information. London: Music Press, 1991. Mus Ref ML 111 .H37x 1991

Use: A new proposal for division of music topics for library cataloguing and bibliographic purposes(it is not a list of musical words with their synonyms–a thesaurus used here is a structured system for organizing information). Purports that current systems are not structured properly and are inadequate. The book is aimed at those involved in determining the cataloging system for the music section of a library.

Coverage: Attempts to lay out a system that allows the inclusion of musical scores and individual journal articles in a catalogue, in addition to the usual material contained regarding the scholarly, profes- sional, and business aspects of music as found in books. Allowance is made for continued expansion of the sphere of musical activity. Also presents a thorough background on thesauri and their design, as well as existing classification systems.

Organization: Introduction includes reasons a new system is being proposed, a history of thesauri and their design, existing classification systems and their weaknesses, and special schemes currently used for structuring bibliographies and their inadequacies. Second portion of the introduction discusses the design of the musaurus and the details of its indexing and divisions. A summary of the musaurus divisions is followed by a detailed outline of the structural system itself. Major divisions include
Musicology
Language Auxiliaries
Musical Instruments
Geography Auxiliaries
Musical Works
History Auxiliaries
Performance
Music Profession & Education
Music Business
Music Documentation
An alphabetical index is also included with the work.

Pros: The structural organization of their proposed system does seem that it would be very helpful to researchers.

Cons: It is only relevant to a select few who could do anything about changing the system used. As a reference tool for the average musician or scholar it is of little use. Its date of publication also makes it possibly irrelevant, given the advances in computer technology of the last ten years that make it possible to search for topics by subjects or individual words in a title without having to worry about an alphabetical catalog or a confusing classification system.

CK


Indiana University. Worldwide Internet Music Resources. http://www.music.indiana.edu/music_resources/. Accessed 29 September, 1999.

Use: Helpful in finding sites and other resources about people in music, music research, popular and classical music and groups.

Coverage: Parts of it not very current. Includes sites, magazines, books, festival information etc.

Organization: Nine general topics: musicians and popular groups, groups and ensembles (except popular), performance, composers and composition, genres, research, commercial world of music, journals and magazines (mostly annotated), general and miscellaneous. Extensive, but not complete. Authors and titles integrated alphabetically within sub-categories.

Pros: Very user-friendly. Shows when each section was last updated.

Cons: Last updated June 6, 1999.

KG


Kupferberg, Herbert. The Book of Classical Music Lists. New York: Facts on File Publications, 1985. Mus Ref ML 63 .K88 1985

Use: A book of lists drawn up by the author about a very great variety of subjects relating to Classical music. Multiple uses include browsing for interesting music tidbits by either the casual or serious Classical music listener or musician and searching for facts about Classical music. Ideal as a reference for someone needing to add some spice to their writing or speaking about music.

Coverage: Covers everything from the philosophy of music to the lives and works of composers to notable facts about the contemporary music business. Author generally limits lists to 10-30 members, depending on the amount of information given for each.

Organization: Lists are organized under several different headings and are found in the table of contents:
Overture
Composers and Compositions
Forms and Instruments
Opera
Medley (i.e., National Anthems, Shakespeare’s Plays in Music, Musical Marriages)
Statistics and Reference
Each list comes under its boldface title. For lists with more extensive elaborations under each member, each member is given in boldface and subsequent lines are set in. An index of composers and works referenced in the lists is also included.

Pros: Very easy to read format. A wide variety of topics, include those off-the-beaten-path, are sampled.

Cons: Nothing is said of the author’s sources or credentials, and many of the lists are subjective, a little out of date, and, of necessity, short.

CK


LeBrecht, Norman. The Book of Musical Anecdotes. New York: The Free Press, 1985. Mus Ref ML 65 .B673 1985

Use: Brings together anecdotes recorded by or about composer and performers. Intended to be a survey about music and the world surrounding it through the recorded experiences of those working most deeply in it. Stated purpose in giving relevant anecdotes is to perhaps bring a deeper understanding of and a certain zest to the music, creating an incentive to explore it further.

Coverage: Ranges from anecdotes by Guido d’Arezzo to Boulez, and includes both composers and performers. Anecdotes are given in the original or translated English. These are figures who have, in the author’s opinion, irrevocably changed the state of music. Twenty persons having the greatest impact on the course of musical development are given more extensive coverage. Only those anecdotes whose authenticity the author has been able to obtain substantial evidence for have been included.

Organization: Organized chronologically according to date of birth. Each entry begins with a brief biographical note, then each anecdote is related in paragraph form. Notes explaining references to other people or events are given at the bottom of the page. Concludes with sources for each quote and an index of significant references in each anecdote.

Pros: offers a very good glimpseinto the world of music and the lives of those who are deeply involved in it.

Cons: This book, by admission by the author, is not comprehensive. Authenticity could present a problem, but as stated above under coverage, the compiler has gone through great lengths to ensure the truthfulness of the anecdotes.

CK


Mixter, Keith E. General Bibliography for Music Research, 3d ed. Detroit Studies in Music Bibliography, no. 75. Detroit Mich.: Harmonie Park Press, 1996. Mus Ref ML 113 .M595 G4 1996

Use: Directs user to music reference sources, bibliographic publications, and other music research resources by topic. Less comprehensive than Duckles.

Coverage: Extensive, international coverage of contemporary, published reference materials and bibliographic sources relating to art music. Focuses mostly on broad research categories rather than narrow musical topics. Current through 1996.

Organization: Ten chapters: Basic Guides to Research, Bibliographies of Bibliographies, National and Trade Bibliographies, etc. Each chapter opens with an introduction, and is then divided into subsections in which bibliographic citations are listed alphabetically. Entries list bibliographic information only. Two indexes: Index of Names, and Title Index.

Pros: Introductions to each chapter. Extended sections on union lists, library catalogues, and bibliographies and indexes of vocal texts. Includes information about computer/online resources.

Cons: Lacks abstracts.

BM


Pruett, James W., and Thomas P. Slavens. Research Guide to Musicology. Sources of Information in the Humanities, no. 4. Chicago: American Library Association, 1985. Mus Ref ML 113 .P83 1985

Use: Part one introduces the reader to the field of musicology in a prose format, while part two directs the reader to reference materials and bibliographic publications.

Coverage: Includes citations for major European language music research resources. Focuses on well-known, highly-regarded materials, particularly those with a broad scope. Current through 1985.

Organization: Two parts: Introduction to Research in Music, and Reference Works. Part one discusses research techniques and the history of musicology in prose. Part two lists important research sources, and is divided into several subcategories: Dictionaries and Encyclopedias, Histories and Chronologies, etc. Entries in part two are organized alphabetically by bibliography. Each entry contains bibliographic information followed by a brief abstract. Two indexes: Author/Title Index, and Subject Index.

Pros: Treats both the “how” and the “what” of musicological research. Annotated entries in part two. Indexes provide additional points of access.

BM


Shapiro, Nat, comp. and ed. The Encyclopedia of Quotations about Music. Garden City, New Jersey: Doubleday & Company, 1978. Mus Ref ML 66 .E6

Use: A book of quotations about music for use in papers and speeches. Also enjoyable as interesting reading for increased enlightenment about music.

Coverage: Includes quotations on major facets of music, from its makeup, composers, business, ancillary professions, performers, and philosophers. Covers a great range of music, from popular and film music to opera and high musical art. Quotations are given in their original or translated English.

Organization: Quotes are organized alphabetically by the person quoted in subjects grouped in various sections that are themselves brought under broader chapter headings. Subjects of chapters include:
Music is..music does..music means...
Creators and Components (composers and their materials, the avant-garde)
Exponents (conductors, instrumentalists, and the music-business)
Proponents and Opponents (critics)
Lift Every Voice (song, singers, and opera)
The Universal Art (physics of music, education, philosophy)
Music for the Millions (jazz, blues, rock, popular, dance, film, and theater)
Metaphysics, Metaphor, and Miscellany (wordplay, aphorisms, more philosophy)
Quotations are separated from each other by right-justified lines containing the name of the person quoted and source of the quotation, and further separated by triple spacing. Includes an index of names of those both quoted and referenced in the quotations and an index of key words or phrases from each quote.

Pros: Index of key words and phrases helps identify the full quotation and its source that one may only know part of. Topical index useful for finding quotations that may help in a paper or speech on a particular subject.

CK